Testate amoebae collected from moss on urban buildings with different age, height and distance to a possible source habitat – are there obvious colonization patterns?

  • Satoshi Shimano Miyagi University of Education, Sendai, Miyagi 980-0845, Japan; Hosei University, Science Research Center, Tokyo, 102-8160, Japan
  • Yuka Onodera Hosei University, Science Research Center, Tokyo, 102-8160, Japan
  • Manfred Wanner Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus-Senftenberg, Department Ecology, 03013 Cottbus, Germany
Keywords: terrestrial protists, resource of urban biodiversity, urban habitat colonization, moss on the roof, Japan

Abstract

Testate amoebae cultures were analyzed from moss samples collected at seven buildings of different age, height, and distance to a putative source habitat in Sendai City, Japan. In total, 13 amoeba taxa colonized buildings. We discussed causes as air currents, animals, or human activities. Neither amoebae from adjacent buildings, nor taxa from buildings with the same age or moss species were grouped by a cluster analysis, pointing to rather stochastic colonization patterns.

 

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Published
2017-12-01
How to Cite
Shimano, S., Onodera, Y., & Wanner, M. (2017). Testate amoebae collected from moss on urban buildings with different age, height and distance to a possible source habitat – are there obvious colonization patterns?. SOIL ORGANISMS, 89(3), 151–155. Retrieved from http://soil-organisms.org/index.php/SO/article/view/75
Section
ARTICLES